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William Huison-Craufurd, of Craufurdland and Braehead

Male 1781 - 1871  (89 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name William Huison-Craufurd 
    Suffix of Craufurdland and Braehead 
    Born 29 Nov 1781  Perth, Perth and Kinross, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 17 Sept 1871  Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Fenwick Parish Church Fenwick, East Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I038746  Ancestorium
    Last Modified 17 Jun 2022 

    Father James (Rev) Moodie,   b. 1740, Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Aug 1831, Cramond, City of Edinburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Huison-Craufurd, of Craufurdland and Braehead,   b. 31 May 1745, Cramond, City of Edinburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jan 1823, (or 1825) Cramond, City of Edinburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Family ID F24468  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Janet Esher Whyte,   b. 22 sept 1784, Cumnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Apr 1856, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Children 
     1. John Reginald Houison Craufurd, of Craufurdland and Braehead,   b. 30 Aug 1811, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Oct 1887, Venice, Città Metropolitana di Venezia, Veneto, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
    Last Modified 17 Jun 2022 
    Family ID F24469  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • William Howison-Craufurd, of Craufurdland and Braehead
      Male 1781 - 1870 (89 years)
      https://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/TNGWebsite/getperson.php?personID=I57093&tree=CC

      Name William Howison-Craufurd [1]
      Suffix of Craufurdland and Braehead
      Born 29 Nov 1781 [2]
      Gender Male
      Name William Houison-Craufurd [3]
      Name William Huison-Craufurd [2]
      Died 5 Dec 1870 [2]
      Person ID I57093 Clan current

      Father Rev. James Moodie, d. 1813
      Mother Elizabeth Howison-Craufurd, of Braehead and Craufurdland, d. 1 Apr 1823
      Married 1777 [1]
      Family ID F31242 Group Sheet | Family Chart

      Family Janet Esther Whyte, d. 1857
      Married 14 Jun 1808 [1]
      Children
      + 1. Elizabeth Constantia Howison-Craufurd, d. Yes, date unknown
      2. John Reginald Howison-Craufurd, d. Yes, date unknown
      3. Janet Winifred Howison-Craufurd, d. Yes, date unknown
      Family ID F28192 Group Sheet | Family Chart

      Notes
      CRAUFURD-HOWISON, WILLIAM, esq. of Craufurdland, in the county of Ayr, and of Braehead, in Mid Lothian, b. 29th November 1781, m. 14th June, 1808, Jane-Esther, only daughter of James Whyte, esq. of Newmains, by his wife, Esther Craufurd, a descendant of the family of Craufurdland, and had issue,
      John-Reginald.
      Elizabeth-Constantia.
      Janet-Winifred
      Mr. Howison-Craufurd, a magistrate and deputy lieutenant in Ayrshire, succeeded his mother, in 1823, who got possession of the estates of John Walkinshaw Craufurd, under a decree of the House of Lords, in 1806. [1]

      Sources
      [S1329] Burkes Commoners Vol II 1935, John Burke, (Published for Henry Colburn 1835), CRAUFURD OF CRAUFURDLAND. (Reliability: 3).

      [S6] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Crawford03 (Reliability: 3).

      [S88] MacLeod genealogy, ("!SOURCE: THE ASSOCIATED CLAN MACLEOD SOCIETIES GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES, The Associated Clan MacLeod Societies, Edinburgh, Scotland, 2000.").
      +++++++++++++++++

      William Houison Craufurd of Craufurdland and Braehead
      https://www.geni.com/people/William-Houison-Craufurd-of-Craufurdland-and-Braehead/6000000038519602826

      William Houison Houison Craufurd, of Craufurdland
      Birthdate: November 29, 1781
      Death: September 1871 (89)
      Immediate Family:
      Son of Rev. James Moodie, afterwards Moodie Houison Craufurd and Elizabeth Houison Craufurd of Craufurdland and Braehead
      Husband of Janet Esther Houison Craufurd (Whyte)
      Father of John Reginald Houison Craufurd of Craufurdland and Braehead; Elizabeth Constantia Houison Craufurd; Janet Winifred Houison Craufurd and Winnifred Janet Houison Craufurd
      Brother of Isabella Keith; Alexander Houison Craufurd; John Houison Craufurd; Elizabeth Beatrix Houison Craufurd; Margaret Elizabeth Houison Craufurd; and Isabella Elizabeth Houison Craufurd « less

      Managed by: Michael Lawrence Rhodes
      Last Updated: April 30, 2022

      About William Houison Craufurd of Craufurdland and Braehead
      It is unclear whether any of Jock’s descendents were ever called upon to carry out this service until the ‘King’s Jaunt’ by George IV in 1822. Masterminded by Walter Scott, the Houison’s were called upon top perform the duties and William Houison Craufurd presented his ewer and basin, and there George IV washed his hands. The ceremony enlists the services of the three eldest males of the Houison Craufurds, who in order of age, hold the Basin, Ewer, and Silver salver with Linen towel.

      Records suggest that it was then customary for this service to be offered to the Sovereign each time they come to Scotland, although it is unclear how often the service has been carried out. The current Laird, Peter Houison Craufurd has performed the ceremony three times, for three different Monarchs, Edward V, George VI , and our current Monarch Elizabeth II. The service was offer again as part of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee celebrations, but the palace replied that regrettably the Queen’s schedule was too onerous to allow it.

      The service was listed in the book “Keepers of the Kingdom” by Bruce, Calder and Cator, and the photo below was taken of Peter with his two sons Alexander and Simon next two the River Cramond, which Cramond Brig crosses.

      Burke, Bernard, Sir. A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Great Britain & Ireland 6th ed. London : Harrison 1879. Vol I. page 383
      +++++++++++++

      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/208004537/william-houison-craufurd
      William Houison Craufurd
      BIRTH 29 Nov 1781 Perth, Perth and Kinross, Scotland
      DEATH 17 Sep 1871 (aged 89) Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland
      BURIAL Fenwick Parish Church Fenwick, East Ayrshire, Scotland
      MEMORIAL ID 208004537 ·

      Pall Mall Gazette - Tuesday 19 September 1871, p 3:
      THE LATE MR CRAUFURD OF CRAUFURDLAND.
      The remains of the late Mr William Houison Craufurd of Craufurdland, who expired on the 17th inst., at the advanced age of 90 years, were interred on Saturday in the family burying-place at Fenwick. The funeral was of a strictly private nature. On Sunday, sermons appropriate to the occasion were delivered in the Free High Church, Kilmarnock, by the Rev. Dr Buchanan, of Glasgow, and the Rev. Ivie M. Maclachlan, pastor of the congregation, of which the deceased officiated an elder ever since the Disruption. Both clergymen concluded with a few remarks specially bearing upon the life and character of the deceased. Dr Buchanan said that during all those memorable years which preceded and followed the Disruption of 1843, Mr Craufurd was scarcely ever absent from the General Assembly, and from beginning to end of his public life the clearness of his views and the consistency and purity of his proceedings on all the great questions of the time were such as to make his very name tower of strength while he lived; and, now -that he is gone, will leave behind him memory which cannot fail to be a legacy of blessing. He had always regarded him as one of the brightest examples of which our day could boast of that class of men who constituted the moral strength and glory Scotland in other and older times—the God-fearing men, that is, of station and influence who wore not ashamed either of the Gospel Christ or of His persecuted people and cause.

      Gravesite Details
      Burial 23 Sept 1871

      Family Members
      Parents
      James Moody Howison-Craufurd 1740–1831
      Elizabeth Howison Craufurd 1745–1825
      Spouse
      Janet Esther Whyte Craufurd 1784–1856 (m. 1808)
      Siblings
      Alexander Moody 1780–1796
      Margaret Howison Craufurd 1783–1826
      Isabella Howison Craufurd Keith 1787–1871
      Children
      John Reginald Houison Craufurd 1811–1887
      Elizabeth Constance Houison Craufurd Fairlie 1813–1870
      Janet Winifred Craufurd 1817–1836
      +++++++++++++

      William Houison Craufurd
      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Houison_Craufurd

      William-howieson-craufurd-1781-1871-of-craufordlan.jpg
      William Howieson Craufurd by Hill & Adamson
      Personal details
      Born 29 November 1781
      Died 17 September 1871
      Deputy-Lieutenant of the County of Ayr
      Justice of the Peace
      Commissioner of Supply

      William Houison Craufurd sometimes spelled William Howieson Craufurd (29 November 1781 – 17 September 1871) was a landed country gentleman. He was a Deputy-Lieutenant of the County of Ayr, Justice of the Peace, and Commissioner of Supply. After several years as an elder in the Church of Scotland, he left at the Disruption and joined the Free Church of Scotland. He was photographed by Hill & Adamson, pioneering photographers, who recorded many Free Church ministers and leaders.

      Contents
      1 Ancestry, early life and training
      2 Political life and offices
      3 Work as a Church of Scotland elder
      4 At the Disruption
      5 Royal tradition
      6 Death
      7 Family
      8 References
      8.1 Citations
      8.2 Sources

      Ancestry, early life and training[edit]
      William Howieson Craufurd by Hill & Adamson from National Galleries Scotland
      William Howieson Craufurd by Hill & Adamson from Glasgow University's Hill and Adamson collection
      William Houison-Craufurd of Craufurdland and Braehead, was born on 29 November 1781.[1] His father was James Moody, a Church of Scotland minister. James came to the West Church, Perth on 11 June 1772. James Moody assumed the name of Howison Craufurd in consequence of his succession by marriage to the estate of Craufurdland, by decision of the House of Lords on 14 March 1806. He subsequently demitted his post on 2 December 1807. William's mother was Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of John Howison and heiress of Braehead, Cramond.[2] William Houison Craufurd was educated at the High School of Edinburgh, from which he passed to the university.[3]

      Political life and offices[edit]
      In all public matters Mr Craufurd took a great and active interest. He was a Deputy-Lieutenant of the County of Ayr, Justice of the Peace, and Commissioner of Supply. All through life he was a keen politician, thoroughly Conservative, while the progress of events somewhat modified his views, he retained his political opinions to the end.[3]

      Work as a Church of Scotland elder[edit]
      Craufurd occupied the chair at Bible Society and missionary meetings in Edinburgh, and joined with Dr Andrew Thomson in the defence of pure Bible circulation. He also enrolled himself in the ranks of Anti-patronage, a cause which in those days was treated with ridicule and scorn. As an elder of the church, he sat for nearly sixty years in the General Assembly, and although his voice was seldom heard in the discussions, his influence and vote were consistent. [3]

      At the Disruption[edit]
      At the Disruption, along with several other elders and a considerable following of the people, he left the Low Church of Kilmarnock, and attached himself to the Free High Church, in which for twenty-eight years, till the day of his death, he continued to bear office. In everything connected with the congregation he took the deepest interest. The Sustentation Fund especially was financially supported, and he made the Deacons' Courts of the various congregations in which his properties were situated the channel of communication.[3]

      Later in life he was requested by his numerous friends to sit for his portrait, was hung in Craufurdland Castle. The Presbytery of Irvine, whose representative in the General Assembly he had been for fifty years, invited him to a public entertainment to celebrate his official jubilee.[3]

      Royal tradition[edit]
      The Howisons possessed Braehead in Mid Lothian since the reign of James the First. According to a tradition, which is embodied in the popular drama of 'Cramond Brig,' part of the estate was conferred by James the Second or Third, as a reward to one of their ancestors for having gone to the rescue of the king, then wandering about in disguise, when attacked by a gang of gipsies, and with no other weapon than his flail, with which he had been threshing corn in his barn, delivering him from his assailants. The tenure by which this land is held, is the presenting of a basin of water and a napkin to the king of Scotland, to wash his hands, King James, on entering Howison's cottage, before partaking of refreshment, having asked for water and a cloth to wipe the marks of the scuffle from his clothes. This service was performed by Mr. Howison-Crawfurd, then younger of Crawfurdland, in right of the lairdship of Braehead, to King George the Forth, at the banquet given to his majesty by the city of Edinburgh, 24 August 1822, when he was attended by masters Charles and Walter Scott, the one a son, the other a nephew of the author of Waverley, as pages, attired in splendid dresses of scarlet and white satin. The rose-water then used has ever since been hermetically sealed up, and the towel which dried the hands of his majesty on that occasion has never been used for any other purpose. All the documents mentioned as granted to the above-named Archibald Craufurd, almoner to Queen Mary, were likewise carefully preserved by the Craufurdland family.[1]

      Death[edit]
      He died on 17 September 1871.[3] He was buried on 23 September 1871 at the family burial ground at Fenwick Parish Church.[4]

      Family[edit]
      He married on 14 June 1808, Jane Esther, only daughter of James Whyte, Esq. of Newmains, by his wife, Esther Craufurd, with issue.[1] She collected manuscripts including one of 'Epitaph' on Grizzel Grim by Robert Burns.

      References[edit]
      Citations[edit]
      ^ Jump up to: a b c Anderson 1877.
      ^ Scott 1923.
      ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Wylie 1881.
      ^ "William Houison Craufurd". Find a Grave. Retrieved 13 April 2022.
      Sources[edit]
      Anderson, William (1877). "Craufurd of Craufurdland". The Scottish nation: or, The surnames, families, literature, honours, and biographical history of the people of Scotland. Vol. 1. A. Fullarton & co. pp. 702-703.Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
      Brown, Thomas (1893). Annals of the disruption with extracts from the narratives of ministers who left the Scottish establishment in 1843 by Thomas Brown. Edinburgh: Macniven & Wallace. p. 89.
      Buchanan, Robert (1854). The ten years' conflict : being the history of the disruption of the Church of Scotland. Vol. 2. Glasgow ; Edinburgh ; London ; New York: Blackie and Son. p. 590.
      Buchanan, Robert (1871). "obituary". The Home and Foreign Missionary Record of the Free Church of Scotland for 1871. Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson and Sons. pp. 254-255.
      Ewing, William (1914). Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843-1900. Vol. 2. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark. p. 27.
      Guthrie, Thomas (1874). Autobiography of Thomas Guthrie, D.D. Vol. 2. New York: R. Carter and Brothers. p. 44.
      McKay, Archibald (1858). The History of Kilmarnock. Kilmarnock: A. M'Kay. p. 267.
      Scott, Hew (1923). Fasti ecclesiæ scoticanæ; the succession of ministers in the Church of Scotland from the reformation. Vol. 4. Edinburgh : Oliver and Boyd. p. 235.Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
      Wylie, James Aitken, ed. (1881). Disruption worthies : a memorial of 1843, with an historical sketch of the free church of Scotland from 1843 down to the present time. Edinburgh: T. C. Jack. pp. 179–184.Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.